Folkwear Patterns from the past and from around the world

Way back in the 1970's when platform shoes and disco were hyping the nation with it's flashy, fake, exaggerated hip persona there was another movement quietly continuing and expanding - that of the ethnic clothing movement.  This trend of fashion evolved from the dewey-eyed idealists known as the early Hippie movement of embellishing clothing, vintage garments and lots of frills and lace along side the simple shapes of ethnic clothing and hiking boots.  If you don't remember the late 60's and early 70's then perhaps it's time to make some memories of your own and start a trend among your friends.

Whereas: the styles of Disco clothing was fueled by Hollywood, the fashion elite and those hyped up on commercialism; the imagination of the Ethnic & Vintage clothing movement was fueled by the push of the idealistic minds of those who joined the Peace Corps in the early 1960's, those brave souls who traveled to these "foreign" countries & cultures and brought home their passion sharing their treasures found throughout society in many cultural avenues as well as political.  

(Perhaps you've seen the character  on the TV show Seinfeld, J. Peterman - the charismatic catalogue king who traveled to foreign cultures buying merchandise from around the world.  He's a typical example of how the ethnic movement expanded into everyday life of nowadays.  Back then this was all new to everyone.)

This time period brought a different awareness of the world as a whole, as airline travel expanded after World War II and the Korean War and where the areas of mystery were there to be explored.  Hoards of travelers flocked to distant lands of the east, west, north and south in investigation of this wonderful world that we live upon.  Many worked in the Peace Corp while others had other agendas but these all brought forth the world as you know it today. This is the stuff that Folkwear patterns are made of, the mystery and desire to know all individual aspect of a culture that makes it unique unto itself perhaps before it disappears through amalgamation and merges into the hip/hop cultural One World Order.

Recently I was amused to hear on TV documentary on the Beatles the commentator state that they were the ones who brought awareness of India to the fashionable world, which may or may not be true in the broadest sense, but having lived in that time period and hanging out on Haight Street in San Francisco after school as it was a hop, skip and a jump from my high school … lucky me, I know that ethnic fashions of all countries were "hip" a couple of years before 1966 as costumes became all the rage on the street way before George Harrison's famous stroll down Haight Street, when he had his mind blown away by the blossoming of all the different aspects of the counterculture in San Francisco. This explosion was occuring all around the globe as travel to these ethnic countries was exploding as well but mostly fired up by the fashion world in Carnaby Street in London, England.   I think if any connection the Beatles brought Mass Society's awareness of the latest fashion to their door.  The influences had grown up all around them, like flowers to be plucked and enjoyed.

As a teenager wide-eyed wandering on Haight Street I saw the different outfits that the rock stars (Jimi Hendrix, Janis Joplin, Jefferson Airplane, Grateful Dead and the not so stars but hip in their fashion) were wearing, jeans and jackets embellished with hand embroidery and buttons, Edwardian underwear covered in lace and tucks (camisoles & slips) worn as outer garments; velvets adorned in dresses, pants and jackets; and of course beads and ribbons.  I also shopped at the fantastic original clothing stores on Haight Street and Upper Grant Avenue and filled my life with looking at unusual fabrics and hand embroidered much of my clothing that I wore (especially the Pea Coat in the fog), which echoed the primitive art styles of the times.  The Beatnik era was just ending, away from the stark black look (now emulated by the Goth movement) into the colorful, costumed world of the 60's generation and as time went on the love of costumes, hand embroidery and all the hand arts led many of these people towards the Renaissance Fair, the Society of Creative Anachronisms and other folk heritage societies where they could wear their outfits without censure.

It was from this heritage that Folkwear Patterns were born in Forestville, California, in the heart of Sonoma County where a lot of the real hippies headed to when San Francisco was no longer a welcoming place (1967-68).  The smells of homemade bread, jams, vegetarian foods and a simpler way of life gave birth to one of the most famous independent pattern companies of this era.  Folkwear Patterns have been loved for more than 30 years but their look is timeless and classic. The new owner Kate Mathews formerly of Fiberarts Magazine (and Handmade) is carrying on this rich tradition by bringing forth new patterns each year.

When we first started out in 1986 we offered Folkwear in our mail order catalog and was delighted to meet so many people who loved dressing up as much as we did, so in honor of that creative arts time period and in hopes of re-sparking the energy we are once again offering Folkwear Patterns.  If you haven't had the honor of working with a Folkwear pattern you should know that each pattern is a course of embroidery and embellishment techniques in itself.  Beautiful instructions with detailed illustrations make it easy to understand how to put a garment together as well as embellishing as per the period of the pattern.

Collections of Patterns

Asian Patterns

Americas

Caravan

Children

Frontier

Old Europe

Retro

Romantic

Children's Patterns

      

FW#213 Child's Prairie Dress & Pinafore Girls 2-10 

A round yoke dress with a sweet pinafore that fits over the dress instead of an apron.  The dress yoke and pinafore front are perfect for tucked, embroidered, smocked, or beaded embellishment. Also included is a period sunbonnet to protect tender faces from the harmful UV rays from the sun.  You can put a temporary piece of cardboard in the front of the bonnet to make a brim (remove before washing).  This pattern is easily adapted for smocking if you like either on the pinafore or the yoke dress.  Makes a lovely nightgown.

Price $16.95
Quantity requested    

      

FW#225 Childhood Dreams - Victorian style nightgown: Girls 2-12

For a special little girl, here's a scaled-down version of FW#224 Beautiful Dreamer, the Victorian lady's favorite nightgown. An ideal children's style for daytime and special occasions, too. Suggested fabrics: Light to medium-weight cotton, linen, rayon, silk, or blends such as lawn, dotted Swiss, gauze, voile, muslin, challis, broadcloth, or flannel. 

Price $14.95
Quantity requested    

      

FW#208 Kinsale Cloak for Young Maidens Girls 2-12

The little sister to Folkwear's best-selling romantic cloak for adults (FW#207 Kinsale Cloak). Full-length garment fastens at the neck and features a detachable, loosely fitted hood. Pattern includes historical lore, notes for handweavers, and instructions for finishing touches. Suggested fabrics: Velvet, corduroy, denim, wool, handwoven fabrics, heavyweight silk, microfiber.

Price $16.95
Quantity requested    

      

FW#109  Little Folks  Sizes Infant-4T

An international collection for little ones, featuring eight patterns in all four sizes and a variety of optional handiwork techniques.

Dress your sweeties up in a Japanese Kintaro, Mexican Dress and Baby Shirt, Korean Booties, Nepali Chupa, Moroccan Djellaba, or Turkish Tunic and Bloomers. A great pattern to give to expectant mothers or to make up outfits for all sizes as a Baby Shower gift, both mother and child will love you for years.

Infant - 4T  Price $19.95
Quantity requested    

Americas

   

FW#120 Navajo Blouse & Skirt Misses 4-20; Girls 4-10

This pullover blouse was traditionally made of velvet, lined with calico, embellished with silver buttons, and worn with a calico "broomstick" skirt. Vary the fabric combinations to match your own personal style. Pattern includes complete blouse instructions, drawings for tiered skirt, and tips for broomstick pleating effect. Suggested fabrics: Velvet, velveteen, velour, lightweight corduroy, light to medium-weight cottons, blends, and wool. For optional contrasting facings: soft, lightweight cotton (calico is traditional) or blends.

Price $14.95
Quantity requested    

   

FW#124 Bolivian Milkmaid's Jacket Misses 8-14

These short jackets, worn by women of the Bolivian altiplano, are reminiscent of Spanish Conquistador costumes. Beautiful in brightly colored velvet and trimmed with beading and braid. Pattern includes jacket lore and instructions for authentic detailing. Suggested fabrics: Medium to heavyweight fabrics such as velvet, wool, corduroy, flannel, cotton, linen, or silk.

Price $14.95
Quantity requested    

   

FW#125 Huichol Wardrobe Blouse and Skirt sized for Misses 6-16; all other pieces Misses small to Men's large

The lavishly embroidered clothing of the Huichol (pronounced "WEE-chole") Indians of Mexico reflects the richness of their culture. This easy-to-sew collection of traditional garments offers many possibilities for creative embellishment. Information about Huichol dress and authentic detailing included. Suggested fabrics: Light to medium-weight cotton, rayon, linen, or blends; medium-weight silk, muslin, linen; lightweight wool or blends.

Price $19.95
Quantity requested    

   

FW#127 Seminole Jacket & Skirt Misses 6-16; Men's 34-44

This dirndl-style skirt and blouson jacket are distinguished by the intricate and colorful piecing known as Seminole patchwork. The skirt features an optional dust ruffle and hem tuck. Pattern includes information about the history and technique of Seminole patchwork. Suggested fabrics: For Jacket without patchwork, choose medium to heavyweight cotton, wool, linen, flannel, blends, or napped fabrics such as corduroy or velveteen. For Skirt without patchwork, choose light to medium-weight cotton, rayon, wool, linen, or blends. For Jacket and Skirt with patchwork, choose light to medium-weight cotton or blends that are at least 50% cotton.

Price $16.95
Quantity requested    

FW#142 Old Mexico Dress Misses xS-2X Large

This 16th-century Spanish colonial style has survived through the centuries in Mexico, and it enjoyed immense popularity in the U.S. in the mid-to-late 20th century. Through the years, it has always been colorful, practical, and comfortable to wear.

It is also quick and easy to make, with just four pattern pieces. It can be a below-knee dress or mid-thigh blouse. The traditional garment featured brilliantly colored hand-embroidered floral designs. Today's versatile sewing machines make it easy to go wild with decorative stitching, and experiment with applique, piecing, or color blocking for a creative and fun new fashion.

Suggested Fabrics: Woven cottons and cotton blends; lightweight denim; rayons; lightweight linen and linen blends; silks and silk blends.

Price $16.95
Quantity requested    


Page Two of Folkwear Patterns

Collections of Patterns

Asian Patterns

Americas

Caravan

Children

Frontier

Old Europe

Retro

Romantic


---->Finished shopping on this page?
We accept , checks & Paypal
 Send in your order to us here<----

Our cart is a simple one that cannot tell the difference between heavy and light weight items so we have set the rate for heavy and ALWAYS adjust the fee down for lighter orders as we manually process your credit card. If you pay through Paypal we refund the excess immediately. Our cart works with Cookies Enabled so if the button does not work email us your order with your phone number and we'll call to complete the order.

To complete your order just click the SUBMIT button,
To change quantities click RESET

Would you like to be on our e-mail list?

Write to us: smockingstore@gmail.com

Click here to subscribe to our newsletter